Lotus Teases New Electric Hypercar (With Video)

  • Christian Wardlaw has 25 years of experience serving in automotive editorial leadership roles with Autobytel, Edmunds, J.D. Power, and Tribune Publishing. A married father of four, Chris is based in the Los Angeles suburbs and believes fuel cell electric vehicles will power the future.

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Tesla’s first car was an electric 2-seat roadster based on the Lotus Elise. Yes, the Tesla that Elon Musk launched into space, and which now orbits the sun on a path mainly between Earth and Mars, is a modified Lotus. Now, just over a decade after the Tesla Roadster went on sale, Lotus will reveal its own electric sports car in London on July 16, 2019. Lotus calls it the Type 130.

So far, this is what we know about the new Lotus Type 130:

  • Lotus calls the new model a “hypercar”
  • First all-new Lotus in, like, forever
  • Hundreds of hand-raisers express interest in the car, but Lotus will build just 130 examples
  • 130 represents the number of Lotus “types” that the company has introduced over the course of its 71-year history
  • Lotus promises “technical game-changers,” and expects the Type 130 to be “most accomplished” car it has ever made for use on public roads
  • Type 130 will be built at Hethel in Norfolk, United Kingdom, where Lotus is headquartered
  • Customers receive the first cars in 2020

 

Always known for its viscerally satisfying sports cars, accomplished racing cars, and engineering know-how lent to other automakers, Lotus remains based in the U.K. but is owned by Chinese conglomerate Geely. Fun fact: Lotus tuned the suspension on the Isuzu Impulse.

Geely, if you’re unaware, also owns Volvo. And Volvo is killing it. With luck, some of that same magic will rub off on Lotus after the Type 130 effectively puts the storied brand on a new electrified track.


About the Author

  • Christian Wardlaw has 25 years of experience serving in automotive editorial leadership roles with Autobytel, Edmunds, J.D. Power, and Tribune Publishing. A married father of four, Chris is based in the Los Angeles suburbs and believes fuel cell electric vehicles will power the future.

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