New Tesla Roadster’s Range Will Be Above 1000 Km

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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There are two things Tesla co-founder and CEO Elon Musk loves: Saying whatever he wants on Twitter (to the chagrin of the SEC), and keeping exciting Tesla headlines in the news. And, with his latest tweet about the second-generation Tesla Roadster last week, he did both.

Replying to a tweet on a thread about “Motor Trend” having driven from San Francisco to Los Angeles in Model S on a single charge, Musk revealed that the brand’s second-gen Roadster model, which the company revealed last year, will have a range “above 1000km” — or more than 620 miles per charge.

This isn’t an official company promise, though. At reveal, Tesla claimed a 620-mile range. With the Model S’ and Model X’s new range numbers, Twitter user Ryan McCaffrey was curious if the Roadster would benefit from the new tech and receive a higher range estimate. Musk indicated, in a rather coy way, that it would.

And a lot of things Musk has says never come to fruition, and are quickly forgotten. Undoubtedly, such a range would be incredible, and would smash most other EV range figures — by almost double.

Red 2020 Tesla Roadster
Tesla’s second-generation Roadster. | Photo: Tesla

 

Given the size of the vehicle, though, save some next-gen battery technology that Tesla has yet to discuss, it seems unlikely the car could be capable of such a significant range. I say that because the car is simply too small to pack enough batteries to allow for such a driven distance per charge.

Perhaps there is a way for software to eke out 620 miles of range in perfect conditions. With the Roadster’s reported ability to hit 60 miles per hour from a standstill in 1.9 seconds, however, it seems unlikely drivers will see anywhere near that prodigious range. After all, if you mash the accelerator pedal into the carpet, range takes a nosedive.

Since Tesla likely won’t build the thing for another couple years, it has time to improve its software that governs energy usage further. Maybe its engineers will surprise us all and achieve what seems improbable.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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