Porsche Shows Off Interior of New Electric Taycan

  • Jeff Sabatini has written for many publications over his 20 years in automotive journalism, including Car and Driver, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and Sports Car Market magazine. His lifetime car churn includes 30 vehicles: eight GM cars, five Ford products, four Toyotas, three BMWs, two Jeeps, two Chrysler minivans, a Miata, a Mercedes, a Porsche, a Saab, a Subaru, and a Volkswagen.

can be reached at jeffsab@gmail.com
  • Jeff Sabatini has written for many publications over his 20 years in automotive journalism, including Car and Driver, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and Sports Car Market magazine. His lifetime car churn includes 30 vehicles: eight GM cars, five Ford products, four Toyotas, three BMWs, two Jeeps, two Chrysler minivans, a Miata, a Mercedes, a Porsche, a Saab, a Subaru, and a Volkswagen.

can be reached at jeffsab@gmail.com
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pocket

Porsche’s Taycan EV is getting close to production, and the automaker is eager to show off its first all-electric production sports car. The Taycan will be introduced in September and go on sale late this year.

  • A free-standing instrument cluster with a curved 16.8-inch screen forms the centerpiece of its entirely new interior design theme.
  • Anti-reflective glass with a polarizing filter allows the cowl-less instrument panel to be highly visible to the driver.
  • Four display modes allow for traditional instrumentation or a sprawling map, similar to what parent company Volkswagen has been offering in Audi and VW models.
  • A 10.9-inch infotainment screen and voice assistant control will be standard.

Porsche Taycan Interior
The Taycan interior still looks like a Porsche, but a far more modern one. (Photo: Porsche)

Digital design

Porsche says the Taycan interior takes its inspiration from the original 1963 911, as all good Porsches should. But this one has been updated for the digital era, with touch interfaces rather than switches and buttons. While it certainly looks cool, we’ll have to see whether the loss of traditional controls proves frustrating.

Two steering wheels will be offered, including a familiar GT sports wheel with visible screw heads and the dial driving mode control. Porsche will let buyers customize the wheel with colored inserts — for a price, of course.
Porsche Taycan interior
How many screens is too many? Even the passenger can have one in the Taycan. (Photo: Porsche)

Screens for all

An optional passenger touchscreen will flank the standard 10.9-inch infotainment screen. And yet another 8.4-inch haptic panel rests in the center console, giving the Taycan four displays in the front cabin.

Apps and various vehicle control panels can be organized on the customizable central interface screen. Besides the touchscreens, the car responds to “Hey Porsche” for voice command and also recognizes handwriting on the center console panel.

All of those pixels leave no room for a gearshift lever — not that an electric car really needs one anyway — so the Taycan makes do with a compact lever set in the instrument panel as in the 918 hypercar.

Porsche Taycan instrument panel
Porsche has placed the Taycan’s power button on the left side of the steering wheel, in its traditional place for the ignition switch. (Photo: Porsche)

Still a Porsche?

In keeping with the company’s usual practice, a whole host of custom interior options will be available, including contrasting color schemes and wood, carbon fiber, aluminum, or fabric trim. Exclusive interior colors and leather upholstery will be offered, but so too will a leather-free interior that uses recycled materials.

And because it’s a Porsche, the power button will reside on the left side of the steering wheel, right where Porsche ignition switches have been for decades. That alone should at least address the first question of most die-hard Porsche enthusiasts.

Design sketch of the Porsche Taycan interior
Design sketch of the Porsche Taycan interior. (Image: Porsche)

WHY THIS MATTERS

Porsche’s first electric sports car is sure to be closely scrutinized  by prospective buyers and competitors alike. Unlike Tesla, which was able to start from a clean slate in designing its vehicles, Porsche has a long history and an established customer base that is certain to have some conventional expectations. Porsche will need to both satisfy those familiar with its cars while also appealing to new buyers who might prefer a more futuristic interior. And given the well-established lead Tesla maintains in the performance EV segment, Porsche can’t afford to let even a single detail of the Taycan slip.


About the Author

  • Jeff Sabatini has written for many publications over his 20 years in automotive journalism, including Car and Driver, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and Sports Car Market magazine. His lifetime car churn includes 30 vehicles: eight GM cars, five Ford products, four Toyotas, three BMWs, two Jeeps, two Chrysler minivans, a Miata, a Mercedes, a Porsche, a Saab, a Subaru, and a Volkswagen.

can be reached at jeffsab@gmail.com
Close Menu

We use cookies and browser activity to improve your experience, personalize content and ads, and analyze how our sites are used. For more information on how we collect and use this information, please review our Privacy Policy. California consumers may exercise their CCPA rights here.