Tesla Increases Model Y Prices By $1,000 And All Models By 3 Percent In April

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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What we’re seeing from Tesla these days is a live example of  the law of supply and demand economics playing out before our eyes.

Tesla just revealed its all-new compact crossover, the Model Y, on March 15th. And the brand has already — without warning — increased the price for the all-new model.

At its debut on March 15, 2019, Model Y pricing started at $47,00 for the rear-wheel drive long-range trim; $51,000 for the dual-motor long-range trim; and $60,000 for the performance trim. Those all increased by $1,000.

Customers can’t yet order the entry-level Model Y, which was originally priced at $39,000. However, it’s safe to assume that when order banks to open up, it will carry a $40,000 price tag.

Same Game, Different Name

View of the Tesla Model Y interior in white, with a 15-inch touchscreen display on the dashboard.

 

At the same time Tesla quietly bumped Model Y prices, company CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter to announce a three-percent price hike across the brand lineup, which will go into effect on April 2, 2019.

If this seems familiar, it should. Tesla raised prices on its cars March 20, 2019. That was, after slashing prices earlier this year.

Many automakers toy with pricing. Many, however, simply offer customer cash incentives and dealer discounts to move vehicles instead of adjusting the manufacturer suggested retail price. By contrast, Tesla seems to prefer monkeying around with the price tag of its models on a week-by-week basis than adopting the incentive model.

However, this sometimes-public, sometimes-quiet price jockeying can irk buyers who come to discover they paid a much higher premium on their Tesla than they might have if they waited, well, a couple days or weeks.

No matter what is going on inside Tesla that is causing such drastic pricing adjustments, from where I sit, it doesn’t inspire a lot of confidence in the company.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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