VW Offers 8-Year/100,000-Mile ID.3 Battery Warranty

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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Volkswagen is about to unleash a slew of new pure-electric models, starting with the ID.3 compact EV. Ahead of the model’s official debut in September, VW has revealed the ID. product line’s battery warranty.

  • VW has placed an eight-year/100,000-mile warranty on it’s ID. line of EVs.
  • Warranty promises that the batteries will will retain 70% of its usable capacity over that time.
  • It will also offer high-power wall boxes capable recharging the ID.’s batteries over the course of a workday.

VW is clearly quite confident in its battery chemistry and charging infrastructure technology. I say that because the German automaker has put an eight-year, 100,000-mile (160,000 kilometers) warranty on the ID. vehicle battery packs. VW pledges that the battery will retain 70% of its usable capacity over that time. If it falls beneath that, presumably, VW will replace it.

“Our goal is to make sure the ID. batteries last as long as the cars,” Frank Blome, head of the Centre of Excellence in Salzgitter, said in a prepared statement.

Now, I mentioned not just the ID. battery chemistry but also the charging because not only do the batteries themselves need to be robust, so too, do VW’s chargers. It’s one thing for the battery to be able to take high-energy charges over and over for the good part of a decade. It’s another thing entirely for customers to find such a fast-charger. It seems, though, VW is keen to cover both bases.

Electrify America smartphone app find charger screen
Using the new Electrify America app, you can find a charger, pay for and start a charging session, and more. | Photo: Electrify America

 

The ID.3 will be offered with several battery packs, from a 200-mile battery pack up to a 330-mile pack. No matter the pack size customers choose, though, each will be capable of receiving a 125-kilowatt charge. That makes it the fastest-charging EV in its class. VW brags that a driver could make the 450-mile journey from Turin, Italy to Paris, France and only need to recharge twice. And if those EV motorists can use VW’s charge infrastructure app to find fast-chargers along the way, those recharges could take as little as 30 minutes.

VW estimates 50% of charges will be done at home, 25% at public chargers, 20% drivers’ place of work, and 5% done on the side of a freeway. Accordingly, VW is installing chargers all over the U.S. — including at Walmarts — ahead of its launch of the ID. line of vehicles with its Electrify America brand. Plus, the German car giant will offer fast-charger boxes that can be installed at home or at work … that is, if your employer allows it.

Due to its design, which utilizes power capacities up to 11 kilowatts on AC power, VW’s wall boxes can fully recharge one of the ID.’s battery packs over the course of a workday.

Hopefully, for VW and its customers alike, its batteries and drive components are more reliable than Tesla. Since its inception, Tesla’s bottomline has been bogged down by warranty repair costs. In fact, the vehicle downtimes were bothering customers so much, Tesla coded its cars to diagnose themselves and order repair parts before they even got to the repair facility. With any luck, VW’s engineers have done a better job to design reliability into its cars than Tesla.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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