Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Honda Collaborate on E-Motorcycle Standards

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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We’ve pointed out many times lately that most of the traditional Japanese motorcycle brands have been oddly absent in the ever-growing electric motorcycle market. This is a bit odd. After all, Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, and Honda have been widely considered pioneers in the motorcycle space — especially in the development of motorcycle powertrains.

According to a report from The Japan News, the four aforementioned Japanese motorcycle makers are creating a consortium to set electric motorcycle standards. These agreed upon guidelines would include batteries and charging stations. The four Japanese motorcycle giants are reportedly joining forces in order to reignite Japan’s motorcycle market, which has seen declines mostly due to the country’s falling population.

What’s more, Ride Apart is reporting that this new syndicate would include standardized battery-swapping technology. Understandably, this would be a boon to riders across the globe.

Although motorcycles require far less time to recharge than electric cars, recharging even the quickest recharging electric motorcycle still takes five times longer than refueling a gasoline-powered bike. Since a lot of motorcyclists choose them for their efficiency, convenience, and low cost of ownership, lengthy recharging requirements might pose a roadblock to ownership.

If the bikes — no matter if they’re built by Yamaha, Suzuki, Kawasaki, or Honda — could have a depleted battery swapped out with a recharged on in a matter of minutes, that could be a real game changer.

For reference, Harley-Davidson’s first-ever all-electric motorcycle, the LiveWire, requires an hour to fully recharge. Harley is installing charging stations at its dealers around the U.S. in order to aid its early adopter riders. Even still, it’s not what you might call super convenient.

Electric motorcycle are going to need to become exactly that, if they are going to replace gasoline-powered bikes in the future. Hopefully, this sort of standardization across multiple motorcycle makers can help achieve that goal.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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