Excited About Micromobility? Move to Hawaii!

  • Based in Los Angeles, Warren Clarke loves providing readers with the information they need to make smart automotive choices. He's provided content for outlets such as Carfax, Edmunds.com, Credit Karma and the New York Daily News.

can be reached at wgcla@hotmail.com
  • Based in Los Angeles, Warren Clarke loves providing readers with the information they need to make smart automotive choices. He's provided content for outlets such as Carfax, Edmunds.com, Credit Karma and the New York Daily News.

can be reached at wgcla@hotmail.com
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Micromobility isn’t a great match for all environments. For example, if you live in a town that’s frequently blanketed in snow, an e-scooter may not be the most attractive transportation option. However, some cities are a more natural fit. Like Honolulu, Hawaii, which took the top spot in a recent study by Inrix Research, that ranked cities according to where micromobility has the most potential.

  • Honolulu, Hawaii; New Orleans, Louisiana; and Nashville, Tennessee, were the top U.S cities where micromobility could cut into the frequency of car trips.
  • According to Inrix, it arrived at its conclusions by “analyzing trillions of anonymous data points from hundreds of millions of connected devices.”
  • The study shows how micromobility has the potential to deliver benefits to both consumers and businesses alike.

Spin scooters
Cities with nice weather and short trip distances are perfect for micromobility. (Photo: Spin)

Short and sweet

People use e-scooters and e-bicycles in different ways. According to trip distance estimates shared by the National Association of City Transportation Officials, people typically turn to scooters for trips of between one mile and half a mile. They typically use e-bicycles for longer trips lasting between one and three miles. The cities with the most potential for growth are all places where residents make a high number of short-distance trips.

In research that analyzed more than 50 million anonymous car trips, Inrix found that 48 percent of all car trips in the most congested U.S. metro areas cover distances that are less than three miles. Replacing these car trips with scooter and bike trips could bring huge benefits. It could make travel more efficient and cost-effective, and it could reduce traffic congestion, decreasing emissions and providing a boost to the local economy.

Inrix map
(Image: Inrix)

The Top 10

  1. Honolulu, Hawaii
  2. New Orleans, Louisiana
  3. Nashville, Tennessee
  4. Chicago, Illinois
  5. Charlotte, North Carolina
  6. New York City, New York
  7. Portland, Oregon
  8. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  9. Los Angeles, California
  10. San Francisco, California

WHY THIS MATTERS

Going forward, micromobility could change the face of transportation by replacing cars as the vehicles of choice for short-distance trips. Scooters and bikes could also support public transportation options by providing first- and last-mile solutions for those who rely on public transit. For all this to come together, cities need to have a clear understanding of the kind of potential provided by micromobility so they can work with providers to explore opportunities.


About the Author

  • Based in Los Angeles, Warren Clarke loves providing readers with the information they need to make smart automotive choices. He's provided content for outlets such as Carfax, Edmunds.com, Credit Karma and the New York Daily News.

can be reached at wgcla@hotmail.com
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