Harley-Davidson Takes On Bird And Lime In E-Scooter Ridesharing Market, Report Says

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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Iconic motorcycle maker Harley-Davidson, once the brand of choice for outlaws like the Hells Angels, has seen four straight years of sales declines. In 2018 alone, Harley saw a 10.2% drop in retail sales.

The Milwaukee-based company isn’t taking its beating lying down; it’s trying to completely reinvent itself in order to turn the business around. And it might just take on electric scooter ridesharing companies like Lime and Bird to do so.

It’s hard to say if riding a Harley escooter is more or less cool than a stand-up. It might depend on HD figuring out a method to include shareable leather chaps with each rental.

 

According to a recent CNN report, Harley is pondering putting into production shareable e-Bikes and scooters, much like the concepts the brand revealed earlier this year.

“It’s a huge opportunity,” Marc McAllister, vice president of product portfolio at Harley-Davidson, told CNN. “For people who are using Bird and Lime today, how do we give them a much better experience with a Harley-Davidson brand and lifestyle?”

Missing from that gaping hole in the frame of this scooter is one of the main reasons most Harley fans not only love the brand, but buy the products.

 

Does Harley-Davidson have the brand bona fides — or cash in the bank — to take on not only Bird and Lime but also Uber and Lyft? Let’s not forget, traditional automakers like General Motors are also entering the e-Bike market. Harley would have to have some pretty special sauce to compete with the likes of cash-rich GM and Uber.

Rather than entirely change completely from a retail- to a subscription/sharing-based business model, Harley-Davidson is likely best suited to instead invent a better mousetrap. Let the other brands duke it out for the cheapest anonymous e-scooter. Harley should work on making the coolest, best e-bikes and electric motorcycles.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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