Hyundai AI Reports Injuries Seconds After Accident

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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Medical personnel could reach your car sooner following a crash, and be better prepared for your specific injuries, thanks to artificial intelligence (AI).

  • Hyundai and Israeli startup MDGo will use AI to send informed crash and injury data to nearby medical facilities.
  • The idea being that lead information will ensure medics are prepared for specific injuries before they’re on scene.
  • Furthermore, Hyundai will use the data to improve its future vehicle structures to prevent further injuries.

Hyundai and Israeli startup MDGo have partnered to co-develop connected services that keep Hyundai owners safer but also allow them to receive specified treatment more quickly in the event of an accident. And they’ll do this, to start, by sending real time crash and driver injury data to medics and hospitals.

Following a crash in a Hyundai vehicle, MDGo’s AI technology will take vehicle sensor data and analyze the potential injury severity of drivers and passengers alike. Within seven seconds, it will communicate its assessment of potential injuries sustained by vehicle occupants to a nearby hospital in medical terminology. This, in theory, will allow medics to assess the urgency of the scene ahead of time and prepare any specialized treatments en route.

MDGo’s AI will be able to determine, based upon vehicle crash data, what sort of injuries occupants potentially sustained in the collision. | Photo: MDGo

 

Furthermore, MDGo’s AI will analyze subsequent hospital documents and learn from them. In turn, Hyundai will have the full data set with which it can potentially improve its vehicle structures to prevent similar injuries in the future.

“MDGo possesses exceptional AI analysis technology optimized for driver safety,” Youngcho Chi, President and Chief Innovation Officer at Hyundai Motor Group, said in a prepared statement. “Through this technology, we expect a significant improvement in the emergency medical services of vehicles in the short-term while our long-term goal is to provide innovations in passenger experience of vehicle safety utilizing new technology that enable real-time physical monitoring.”

The only issue I see in that latter point is that MDGo and Hyundai will somehow access personal medical data. I’ve been thinking on this. And I cannot foresee a way in which it can anonymize the medical data and still effectively learn from it. I mean, it can say X car crashed and the driver sustained X injuries. But, at some level down the line, it will have to know which car and which patients were in that car in order to effectively learn. And it’s that lack of anonymity that worries me.

I’m not a big privacy nut. Still, it rubs me the wrong way to consider that Hyundai wants access to my medical records. I trust it has good intentions. However, I don’t know what else it will do with that information or what other companies could access it, too. I mean, who exactly is MDGo? After this partnership is ended, what happens to that data and who is the proprietor of it? I have reached out to Hyundai for further clarification on these points. As this is written, I have not heard back. I will update if and when I hear more.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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