Porsche Allows Developers Access to Mission E Electric Study Data to Shape the Future of Mobility

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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The key to future mobility is going to be more than simply moving people around in nice electric vehicles. Brands will be made, differentiated, and potentially broken by the experience and, importantly, services they offer customers while they’re on the go.

With the realization that the best idea might not come from within, Porsche kicked off the second year of its Porsche Next OI (open innovation) competition at Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona in February. The competition makes available 300 data sources from the German automaker’s Mission E Cross Turismo electric study to anyone in the world who wants it, from developers to students to suppliers.

In the past, it was enough to make great driver’s cars. The future however will require providing customers with a complete ownership experience that may even continue far outside the car.(Porsche)

With the data, developers will compete to create apps and services focused on three experiences: Home, Driving, and Arrival. Porsche hopes developers will create products that aid Porsche owners in remaining connected at home, productive on the road, and in the transition from vehicle to their destination or to another mode of transport.

The competition was created in partnership with Berlin-based connected car application programming interface (API) platform High Mobility. The competition runs between now and April 30, 2019. The winning team will work to further develop their product with Porsche.

Porsche Next IO signals two things. First, it indicates that Porsche isn’t surrendering in-car infotainment to either Google or Apple and that it intends to continue to hone its own human machine interface and app universe. Secondly, as referenced in the introduction, mobility won’t be solely centered on the vehicle.

Instead, any company’s success—not just Porsche’s—will hinge greatly on the experience of mobility. If Porsche can help create distinctive and valuable apps and services that attract potential customers and distinguish its brand from its rivals, it will fare better.

Porsche can build the best sports cars in the world. However, those bona fides mean nothing to customers stuck in urban traffic.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

can be reached at nickjaynes@gmail.com
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