EV Startup Canoo Never Wants You To Buy Its 300-Mile-Range Electric Car

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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EV startup brand Canoo, formerly EVelozcity, revealed this week that it plans to offer subscription-only 300-mile-range EVs starting in 2021.

The Canoos will ride on skateboard electric platforms that house the battery and motor in one, thus allowing for different bodies to be bolted on top. Depending on the model, the Canoos are expected to return 300 miles per charge.

More than subscription-only personal transport EVs, the Canoos will also be offered as ride-hailing and delivery vehicles. To demonstrate the flexibility of is platform and the various forms they could take, Canoo included some rough renderings of the potential layouts along with its press release.

Canoo’s “Lifestyle” vehicle rendering. While we love the idea of greener transportation, we think the plant might be just one step too far.

These artist renditions include a 21st century take on the Maxell blown away guy (top image), a person lounging in an apartment car (middle), and a bored guy on an airport shuttle (bottom image).

Canoo has reportedly been developing its cars for a few years, since its founding in 2017. Though young, the startup has some impressive members on its team. They include two Faraday Future alumnus, Stefan Krause (former FF CFO) and Ulrich Kranz (former FF CTO). Canoo has also attracted Clemens Schmitz-Justen, former president of BMW Manufacturing and Uber veteran James Cox.

Rather than throw itself into an Elon Musk-esque “production hell,” Canoo wisely plans to farm-out manufacturing to contractors in China and the United States. And, like airlines, the brand aims to refurbish its vehicles rather than trash them and build new ones.

Canoo’s “Ridehail” vehicle rendering. Future technology shuttle the same bored passengers to their flights.

As for why the company changed its name to Canoo, the company chief Stefan Krause said it best: “We picked Canoo because it sounds distinctive, looks cool, and creates a feeling of both relaxation and movement. For thousands of years, a canoe has been a simple, sustainable transportation device used all over the world.”

My question is, how are we going to turn Canoo into a verb, like we’ve done with Uber and Google? “How are you getting to the party? Are you going to Canoo there?” or “They can just Canoo the Thai food here.”

Either way, I am already looking forward to adding the word to my daily lexicon.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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