Swedish Rideshare Springs Pogo Sticks On Streets Of San Francisco

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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Do you crave more excitement and serious injuries? Forget e-scooters. The latest in rideshare-mobility is pogo sticks. Yes, you read that correctly.

  • Swedish startup Cangoroo is bringing app-accessed pogo sticks as a first-mile-last-mile mobility solution.
  • Company will launch in Malmö and Stockholm, Sweden in June.
  • It aims to expand to San Francisco, California, and London, England by fall.
  • And, no, the company swears that this is not a joke, saying, “Cangoroo is 100% real.”

You know your startup is on the right track when you have to issue a supplemental press release to re-emphasize that your company is indeed real and not a joke. That’s exactly what Cangoroo had to do last week. Two days after it revealed its introductory press packet, shared pogo stick company Cangoroo had to reiterate in a follow up bulletin that read, “We feel the need to underline that Cangoroo is 100% real.”

Can you blame the public and members of the media for questioning company leaders on the company’s legitimacy? They want to put app-accessible pogo sticks into the hands of urban commuters around the globe. Even as I write this, there is still a voice in my brain telling me that this is a joke. No matter, let’s jump to the details, shall we?

Cangoroo pogo-stick rentals work the same as electric scooter brands Bird or Lime. Hop on the company’s app, find a nearby stick, pay to unlock it, and you’re bouncing off to work or play, but probably to the emergency room. It’s $1.00 to unlock a pogo. Then it’s an additional $0.30 per minute while you’re jumping. You can temporarily park your pogo for that same $0.30/minute rate.

Cangoroo’s app is similar to e-scooter apps Bird and Lime. | Photo: Cangoroo

 

Are you curious who would find a pogo stick a compelling commuting device? Cangoroo has an answer, “People who’d like to add friction, joy and movement to their daily commute and as a great bonus it’s 100% emission free,” psychologist and Cangoroo co-financier Niklas Laninge said in a statement. “Furthermore, in my role as a psychologist, I’m well aware of the incredible effect an active life and environmentally conscious choices have on people’s health and well-being.”

The company is launching in two cities, Malmö and Stockholm, Sweden, in June. It then plans to expand to San Francisco, California, and London, England by fall (with an emphasis on fall — am I right?).

Presumably, the pogo sticks won’t be allowed on sidewalks (who’s going to stop them, though?) and they’ll be forced into bike lanes. Although this puts them out of the way of pedestrians, it puts pogo-ers dangerously close to cars. I can just imagine someone bouncing into the path of oncoming traffic now.

Just a few weeks ahead of Cangoroo’s brand debut, we got an initial glimpse into just how dangerous e-scooters are. In just shy of three months, one in 5,000 e-scooter riders in Austin, Texas were injured — 48% of those sustained head trauma and 35% broke a bone. And that was on wheeled devices with brakes. Imagine the casualty rate pogo sticks will invite. I’m imagining the streets of Stockholm looking like the beaches of Normandy on D-Day During World War II, but, you know, with fewer people wearing helmets.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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