Sacramentans Prefer eBikes To Uber A Majority Of The Time, Report Says

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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Uber purchased eBike brand Jump in 2018 in order to extend mobility accessibility for its customers and to prove to municipalities it was interested in investing in eco-friendly transportation—not just gas-burning cars.

Surprisingly for every party involved, residents of Sacramento, California opted to ride a Jump bike more than half the time, according to the Sacramento Bee. To be exact, Jump bikes account for 53 percent of rides in the city compared with Uber car’s 47 percent.

This represents the first time an American city has demonstrated a preference for eBikes over cars.

While not representative of most American cities, Sacramento has embraced Jump Bikes as a viable form of transportation and an alternative ride-share cars.

 

After purchasing Jump last year, Uber pushed its electric-assist bikes into 16 U.S. cities, populating them with 1,000 bikes in total. This fleet of bikes reportedly averages 6,500 rides per non-rainy days.

“Our acquisition of Jump was a direct investment in the idea that the best way to get around a city is not always in a car,” Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said in a speech last fall. “We recognize we need to step up and support cities that take bold steps to solve their transportation problems.”

According to local data, Jump represents 53% of the total ride-share market in Sacramento, California.

 

This revelation should come as welcome news to mobility brands keen to monetize more than just car rides.

General Motors recently revealed its first line of eBike, branded ARĪV, which will sell eBikes to customers in Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands.

Selling eBikes is just the first step to populating cities around the globe with A-to-Z, door-to-door mobility solutions. However, it’s been unclear whether Americans would come to accept getting around without the comfort of a car.

Sacramentans prove that the diversified mobility plan might have legs (or e-assisted wheels) after all.


About the Author

  • Nick Jaynes has worked for more than a decade in automotive media industry. In that time, he's done it all—from public relations for Chevrolet to new-car reviews for Mashable. Nick now lives in Portland, Oregon and spends his weekends traversing off-road trails in his 100 Series Toyota Land Cruiser.

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